The Modern Opera Experience II

Yesterday mom and I went to our final opera broadcast of the season: that of Gaetano Donizetti’s Roberto Devereux, the completion of the Met’s staging and broadcasting of all three of his “Tudor Queen” operas four an a half years after they first aired Anna Bolena in 2011.  It was a season of the familiar on the Met’s screen; they had already had Roberto Alagna and Kristine Opalais singing opposite each other in two of the broadcasted operas, and now they had Matthew Polenzani and Mariusz Kwiecien for the second time this season singing two points of a love triangle and seeming to be more in love with each other than with the woman involved!  Although despite the title the real star was Sondra Radvanovsky singing Queen Elizabeth I.  Throw in Elina Garanca, and some of the most beautiful music Donizetti’s ever written, and one’s in for an afternoon of true beauty-if, that is, you are lucky enough to be a theater where the sound is working.

Unfortunately, my mother and I were not.  Instead we were in one that had continual problems with both the image and sound; they both would sometimes go smoothly for a while, then start freezing and stammering, then there would a loud burst of static and sometimes after that things would get better, but not always, and they wouldn’t stay better.  During those minutes where everything was working, we could greatly admire the singing, the acting, and the drama especially during the second act, where it had better emotional effect, but then would come that stammering again and we’d be knocked out of it.  The climax was intense enough that even with the sound still struggling it was easier to stay engaged with it, and yet one is still aware of how it could have been far better still, had Radvanovsky been the wall of grief and song she’s supposed to be.  Also the finale wasn’t quite over when whoever was in charge of the lights thought it was and raised them!

At the intermission, as I read the Wikipedia article on the actual Robert Devereux and noted how ridiculously unlike the opera the true history was(but it’s opera; one should expect that), we also got a list of next year’s operas.  Mom wants to see quite a few of them, even some of the reruns of operas we’ve seen already.  I’d be for seeing some of them too, but given that apparently the sound issues were even worse when she attended the rerun of Madam Butterfly, perhaps we should look into any other cinemas doing the broadcast, and if there are any that aren’t too far away.

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Next Season at the Met

Taking a look at the list of ten Met Opera performances being showed at the movies next season, I’m afraid I’m rather disappointed.   Anna Netrebko will likely be hopelessly miscast as Tatiana in Eugene Onegin, not only are to retransmitting multiple productions they’ve done already, but the shows getting shown again aren’t even their best, and to be honest I have limited interest in seeing a couple of the other operas; Cosi fan tutte  in particular I think I’ll care to skip.  Though it is amusing to have Robert Alagna doing one of the reruns again.  Perhaps their advertisement for seeing these productions is that they’ve got Alagna in them this time(except George Gagnidze did not make the best Scarpia, and now for some inexplicable reason they’ve failed to replace him).  One wonders why they didn’t get him for them the first time around, but never mind.  Similar is La Cenerentola with its all-star cast, except they have a newbie as Dandini, which is silly of them, since that’s the guy who’s supposed to steal the show, and without a reliable guy there DiDonato is not enough to lure one in, perhaps.

After the Verdi anniversary fest that was this year in opera(the Met wasn’t the only one participating), it seems next year they want to do Russian-themed operas, with three of them being so themed.  And being a skating fan, of course I’ll be interested in seeing Prince Igor, and Ildar Abdrazakov is more of a singer to look forward to than Netrebko, thankfully.  Though the real cast to look forward to is for this Massenet opera; since I’m skipping the Wagner tomorrow, it’ll be far too long since I’ve seen Jonas Kaufman, and I’ve seen Elina Garanca make bad opera good and good opera better, so whichever Werther happens to be that should be all right.  And for holdover Verdi, Falstaff should be interesting as well.

Met Opera Broadcasts: Otello, The Tempest, & La Clamenza di Tito

The Met’s broadcast season is now well underway, and I have finally managed to get through one of their operas without getting too strong a headache to write about it afterwards(happening way too much to me at the movies lately; I had one after Skyfall too), but there’s really not much to say about La Clamenza di Tito.  

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